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Word of the Day – Exactor

Word of the Day – Exactor

Word of the Day – Exactor

Today’s Do-English word of the day is, Exactor. [ɪɡˈzæktɚ-or]
Click Here to read this in Spanish

Origin

The origin of the word Exactor is from the word exact, which is a middle English word from 1400.

Part of speech

The word Exactor is a noun.

Meaning

The word Exactor is used to describe a person who makes illegal or unreasonable demands.

Examples

My boss is an exactor, yesterday he insisted I stay in the office until midnight and work with no pay.

The accused is clearly an exactor of the worst kind, demanding a ransom of £20 million for a dog.

I hate paying taxes, this government is such an exactor.

Palabra del día – Expediency

La palabra de hoy de Do-English es, Exactor. [ɪɡˈzæktɚ-or]

Origen

Exactor es una derivación de la palabra ‘exact’, que viene del inglés del año 1400.

Tipo de palabra

La palabra Exactor es un sustantivo.

Significado

La palabra Exactor se usa para describir una persona que hace algo illegal o realiza una demanda irracional.

Ejemplos

My boss is an exactor, yesterday he insisted I stay in the office until midnight and work with no pay.

The accused is clearly an exactor of the worst kind, demanding a ransom of £20million for a dog.

I hate paying taxes, this governments is such an exactor.

Texto: Feargal Coffey – feargal@do-english.es
Meme: Feargal Coffey – feargal@do-english.es
Traducción: Juan Luis Ramon Cervera – juan@do-english.es
Photos: Pixabay
(c) 2017 Do-English

#English #Word #of #the #day #Exactor #Como #aprender #ingles #to #en #ingles #numeros #en #ingles
#clases #de #ingles

Word of the Day – Expediency

Word of the Day – Expediency

Word of the Day – Expediency

Today’s Do-English word of the day is, expediency. [ik-spee-dee-uh n-see]

Origin

The origin of the word expediency is late Latin.

Part of speech

The word expediency is a adjective.

Meaning

The word expediency is used to suggest an entity who does something in their own self-interest or convenience rather than for what is proper or moral.

Examples

“A new history of the British Empire elevates expediency to principle.” – The Atlantic dot com

“Capital punishment is expedient.” – “Public Speaking” by Clarence Stratton.

“The lawyer’s truth is not truth, but consistency or a consistent expediency.” – Henry David Thorea.

Word of the Day – Expediency - Learn English online - Aprender Ingles Online

Text: Feargal Coffey – feargal@do-english.es
Meme: Feargal Coffey – feargal@do-english.es
Translation: Juan Luis Ramon Cervera – juan@do-english.es
Photos: Pixabay
(c) 2017 Do-English
#English #Word #of #the #Day #Expediency

Are you making this mistake when you use the word about?

Are you making this mistake when you use the word about?

Are you making this mistake when you use the word about?

Are you making this mistake when you use the word about?

¿Cometes este error cuando usas la palabra ‘about’?

En esta breve clase gratis de Do-English explicaremos por qué algunas personas no nativas inglesas pueden parecer groseras y ofensivas al utilizar la palabra ‘about’ en un contexto equivocado.

Tiempo de lectura 10 ,minutos.
Nivel – C1

Recientemente, en una de mis clases de inglés online en Do-English en un break, oí a uno de mis alumnos usar la palabra ‘about’ en una frase. Gramaticalmente y estructuralmente el alumno estaba usando la palabra ‘about’ correctamente, pero el contexto era erróneo.
Fue un error muy simple que muchos no nativos ingleses cometen, por desgracia, suena maleducado cuando no se tiene intención de ofender.

Antes de continuar con la clase, recuerda que en en Do-English estamos para ayudarte a mejorar tu inglés, inglés comercial y a preparar los exámenes del colegio y tests de nivel.
Hacemos esto de dos formas, con nuestros posts gratuitos como este y con las clases online en nuestra aula virtual.

Nuestras clases de inglés están organizadas con profesores nativos y las clases son en grupos de sólo 3 a 10 alumnos.

Puedes realizar las clases online de Do-English en cualquier sitio, en casa, en tu oficina, en un café con wifi, en fin, allí donde haya una buena señal señal de internet podrás realizar las clases con Do-English.
Click Aquí/ para más información sobre clases online de inglés Do-English.

Volvamos a la clase.
Para leer esto en español
Click Here.

Are you making this mistake when you use the word about?

In this short free Do-English lesson, I will explain why some non-native English speakers can sound rude and offensive, without meaning too, when they use the word ‘about’ in the wrong context.

Recently I was teaching an online English lesson for Do-English and in a breakout session I heard one of my students using the word about, in a sentence.
Grammatically and structurally my student was using the word ‘about’ correctly, but the context was wrong.
It was a simple mistake that many non-native English speakers make which, unfortunately makes them sound rude or offensive, when the don’t intend too.

Are you making this mistake when you use the word about fitness

Before I tell your more about this lesson, remember at Do-English we are here to help you improve your general English, business English, school English and exam level English.
We do that in two ways, with our free posts like this one, and with live online English lessons in our virtual classrooms.
Our online English lessons are structured, our tutors are native English speakers and our class sizes are only 3 to 10 students.

You can have Do-English online English lessons anywhere, at home, in your office, at the local internet café, in fact as long as there is a good internet signal, you can take lessons with Do-English.
Click Here for more about Do-English online English lessons.




Now back to the lesson.

Let’s start with a quick review of the word ‘about’.

What type of word is ‘about’?

About, is both a conjunction and a preposition.

How do I use ‘about’ as conjunction?

As you know a conjunction is used to glue two parts of a sentence together, typical examples conjunctions are ‘and’ & ‘but’.
In general ‘and’ is used to glue two positive or two negatives parts of a sentence together.

He was driving his car and singing along with a song on the radio.

He had no money and no place to live.

In general ‘but’ is used to glue a negative part of a sentence to a positive a positive part of the same sentence.

He had no money but he had loving family.

When we use ‘about’ as a conjunction we introduce an idea or a statement in the first part of the sentence and explain what that idea or statement means in the second part of the sentence.

When a reader reads, or listener hears a statement followed by the word ‘about’ they know that

  • There will be a second part to the sentence.
  • The second part of the sentence will explain the first.

Example One:

“Good communication is all about getting your message understood.”

In the first part of the example sentence, the speaker makes the statement; Good communication is…
The speaker then uses ‘about’ as a conjunction – so that the reader or listener will know there is an explanation coming.
Finally, in the second part of the example sentence, the speaker tells us what they think good communication means; getting your message understood.

Example Two:

“Going to the gym is about getting fit”

In this example sentence, the speaker makes the statement; Going to the gym is…
The speaker adds the conjunction ‘about’, so we know there is an explanation coming.
The speakers then tells us what going to the gym is for; getting fit.

About, as a conjunction is used to explain a statement or phrase.




When do we use about as a preposition?

There are many ways to use about as a preposition, and I will start by explaining ‘about to’.
‘About to’ is mostly used in past or present tense sentences.

‘About to’ is used to tell the listener or reader that an imminent and planned future action is or was prevented from happening because of an unforeseen current action.

Are you making this mistake when you use the word about cinema

Example One:

I am walking to the front door of my house because I am leaving for the evening.
Before I can open my front door, someone rings the door bell, I open my door and see my friend.
I can say:

“I was about to leave, but please come in”

In this example, the imminent future action, is the plan to leave, but this future action is prevented from happening when my friend rings the doorbell.

Example Two:

I am in my bedroom and about to go to sleep, but my mobile phone rings, it is my mother, so I answer the phone.
I can say:

“Mother, I was about to go to sleep but you called, is very thing okay?”

In this example the imminent future action, is the plan to go to sleep, but this action is prevented from happening when my mother calls me on my phone.

Example Three:

Yesterday I was in cinema; the advertisements had finished and the movie was about to start. Then my phone rang.
I can say:

“Yesterday I was in the cinema and the movie was about to start when my phone rang.”

In this example sentence the speaker is talking about two past actions, the phone ringing and the movie starting.
The speakers imminent plan was to watch the movie, but this plan was prevented from happening when the phone rang.

It is possible to use ‘about to’ in future tense but this is rather complicated because we are talking about two possible future events.

Example Four:

Tomorrow we are having a friend over for dinner.
We are planning to go shopping and then finish making the dinner a few seconds before our friend arrives, we can say:

“He will be just about to arrive when we finish making the dinner.”

As I said this is a complicated construction and relies on a lot of possibilities. Which is why we don’t use ‘about to’ often in the future tense.
‘About to’ is used to express when an imminent planned future action is prevented from happening by an unforeseen present action.




About it.

When used on its own ‘about it’ is used to ask someone for information or instructions.
Asking for information:

“When you can, please tell me all about it”

Asking for instructions:

“What do you want me to do about it?”
“What would you like me to do about it?”

Are you making this mistake when you use the word about workshop

DANGER -BE CAREFUL:

  • When we use the construction “want + about it” the speaker is normally not happy to help.
  • When we use the construction “would like + about it” the speaker is usually happy to help.

Example One:

Speaker One: “My car broke down”
Speaker Two: “What do you want me to do about it?”

In this example speaker two is not happy with speaker one and is not prepared to help.

Example Two:

Speaker One: “My car broke down”
Speaker Two: “No problem, what would you like me to do about it?”

In this example speaker two is happy to help speaker one.

On its own ‘about it’ is used to ask for instructions or information

Be quick about it/don’t be slow about it.

‘Be quick about it’ and ‘don’t be slow about it’ both mean the same thing.
They are used to tell the listener to do something, now.

Example:

“Bring me my tea, and be quick about it”

“Bring me my tea, and don’t be slow about it”

In these examples the speaker is telling the listener to bring tea, and to do it now.

DANGER -BE CAREFUL:

The phrase, ‘be quick about it’ was the phrase that the student I mentioned earlier was using incorrectly.
Each time my student asked their partner a question, they added the phrase, ‘be quick about’ it at the end of the question.

“Where do you live? And be quick about it.”




I asked my student why she was adding the phrase to her questions, and she said to me that she wanted to encourage her partner to answer the questions quickly.
I asked my student if she knew was being rude, and she said no.
I explained. when a speaker uses the phrases ‘be quick about it’ or ‘don’t be slow about it’ they are usually angry or not happy with the person they are speaking to.

‘Be quick about it/don’t be slow about it’ is used to tell the listener to do the action now and not to wait.
Native speakers use this construction when they are frustrated or annoyed with the person they are speaking too.
DO NOT USE THIS CONSTRUTION WHEN YOU ARE HAPPY WITH THE ACTIONS OF THE LISTNER.

When I asked my student, she told me that she had learnt the phrase “be quick about it” from an English teacher, who told her that is was safe to use in all contexts.
My student also told me that the English teacher who made this mistake was a non-native.
I suppose this is where the error occurred. It is not a question of construction or grammar but of context.
Remember it is always best to learn your English from native speaking English teachers who have been trained to teach English as a foreign language.

About quick review.

About, as a conjunction is used to explain a statement or phrase.
About, as a preposition.
‘About to’ is used to express when an imminent planned future action is prevented from happening by an unforeseen present action.
On its own ‘about it’ is used to ask for instructions or information.
‘Be quick about it/don’t be slow about it’ is used to tell the listener to do the action now and not to wait.
Native speakers use this construction when they are frustrated or annoyed with the person they are speaking too.
DO NOTE USE THIS CONSTRUTION WHEN YOU ARE HAPPY WITH THE ACTIONS OF THE LISTNER.

Are you making this mistake when you use the word about meme

About - Is it rude?

Take this fun free quiz to test what you know about, about!

What are Do-English online English lessons?

Online English lessons from Do-English are English lessons that take place in virtual classrooms with a native English tutor and between 3 and 10 students.
Just like real language school classrooms, Do-English virtual classrooms have video & audio, whiteboard, learning library, and many more functions.

Are Do-English online English lessons structured?

Yes, they are.
At Do-English our tutors are all trained TEFL tutors.
We use internationally proven course books, from the famous Headyway to Market Leader and many more in-between.
We also know that continuity in learning is very important.
That is why our clients always have the same tutor, and classmates at the same time each week.
Don’t be fooled by online schools offering unlimited lessons, such lessons could be in large chat rooms, with multiply users all trying to get the attention of just one teacher.

Why Should I choose Do-English for my English lessons?

There are many reasons to choose Do-English, and here is a list of a few:

  • Our tutors are native English tutors who live in English speaking countries.
  • Our administration team is in Spain and speak Spanish.
  • Our virtual classrooms are proper classrooms, not just Skype or WOW.
  • Our lessons are value for money
  • You can learn from anywhere there is an internet connection.

We want you to try before you buy.

Now read this blog post in Spanish.


Let’s start with a quick review of the word ‘about’.

What type of word is ‘about’?

About, is both a conjunction and a preposition.

How do I use ‘about’ as conjunction?

As you know a conjunction is used to glue two parts of a sentence together, typical examples conjunctions are ‘and’ & ‘but’.
In general ‘and’ is used to glue two positive or two negatives parts of a sentence together.

He was driving his car and singing along with a song on the radio.

He had no money and no place to live.

In general ‘but’ is used to glue a negative part of a sentence to a positive a positive part of the same sentence.

He had no money but he had loving family.

When we use ‘about’ as a conjunction we introduce an idea or a statement in the first part of the sentence and explain what that idea or statement means in the second part of the sentence.

When a reader reads, or listener hears a statement followed by the word ‘about’ they know that

  • There will be a second part to the sentence.
  • The second part of the sentence will explain the first.




Example One:

“Good communication is all about getting your message understood.”

In the first part of the example sentence, the speaker makes the statement; Good communication is…
The speaker then uses ‘about’ as a conjunction – so that the reader or listener will know there is an explanation coming.
Finally, in the second part of the example sentence, the speaker tells us what they think good communication means; getting your message understood.

Example Two:

“Going to the gym is about getting fit”

In this example sentence, the speaker makes the statement; Going to the gym is…
The speaker adds the conjunction ‘about’, so we know there is an explanation coming.
The speakers then tells us what going to the gym is for; getting fit.

¿Está cometiendo este error cuando usa la palabra acerca de aptitud

About, as a conjunction is used to explain a statement or phrase.

When do we use about as a preposition?

There are many ways to use about as a preposition, and I will start by explaining ‘about to’.
About to’ is mostly used in past or present tense sentences.

About to’ is used to tell the listener or reader that an imminent and planned future action is or was prevented from happening because of an unforeseen current action.

Example One:

I am walking to the front door of my house because I am leaving for the evening.
Before I can open my front door, someone rings the door bell, I open my door and see my friend.
I can say:

I was about to leave, but please come in

In this example, the imminent future action, is the plan to leave, but this future action is prevented from happening when my friend rings the doorbell.

Example Two:

I am in my bedroom and about to go to sleep, but my mobile phone rings, it is my mother, so I answer the phone.
I can say:

“Mother, I was about to go to sleep but you called, is very thing okay?”

In this example the imminent future action, is the plan to go to sleep, but this action is prevented from happening when my mother calls me on my phone.




Example Three:

Yesterday I was in cinema; the advertisements had finished and the movie was about to start. Then my phone rang.
I can say:

“Yesterday I was in the cinema and the movie was about to start when my phone rang.”

In this example sentence the speaker is talking about two past actions, the phone ringing and the movie starting.
The speakers imminent plan was to watch the movie, but this plan was prevented from happening when the phone rang.
It is possible to use ‘about to’ in future tense but this is rather complicated because we are talking about two possible future events.

¿Está cometiendo este error cuando usa la palabra acerca de cine

Example Four:

Tomorrow we are having a friend over for dinner.
We are planning to go shopping and then finish making the dinner a few seconds before our friend arrives, we can say:

“He will be just about to arrive when we finish making the dinner.”

As I said this is a complicated construction and relies on a lot of possibilities. Which is why we don’t use ‘about to’ often in the future tense.
About to’ is used to express when an imminent planned future action is prevented from happening by an unforeseen present action.

About it.

When used on its own ‘about it’ is used to ask someone for information or instructions.
Asking for information:

“When you can, please tell me all about it”

Asking for instructions:

“What do you want me to do about it?”
“What would you like me to do about it?”




DANGER -BE CAREFUL:

  • When we use the construction “want + about it” the speaker is normally not happy to help.
  • When we use the construction “would like + about it” the speaker is usually happy to help.

Example One:

Speaker One: “My car broke down”
Speaker Two: “What do you want me to do about it?”

In this example speaker two is not happy with speaker one and is not prepared to help.

Example Two:

Speaker One: “My car broke down”
Speaker Two: “No problem, what would you like me to do about it?”

In this example speaker two is happy to help speaker one.

¿Está cometiendo este error cuando usa la palabra acerca de garaje

On its own ‘about it’ is used to ask for instructions or information

Be quick about it/don’t be slow about it.

Be quick about it’ and ‘don’t be slow about it’ both mean the same thing.
They are used to tell the listener to do something, now.

Example:

“Bring me my tea, and be quick about it”
“Bring me my tea, and don’t be slow about it”

In these examples the speaker is telling the listener to bring tea, and to do it now.

DANGER -BE CAREFUL:

The phrase, ‘be quick about it’ was the phrase that the student I mentioned earlier was using incorrectly.
Each time my student asked their partner a question, they added the phrase, ‘be quick about’ it at the end of the question.

“Where do you live? And be quick about it.”

I asked my student why she was adding the phrase to her questions, and she said to me that she wanted to encourage her partner to answer the questions quickly.
I asked my student if she knew was being rude, and she said no.
I explained. when a speaker uses the phrases ‘be quick about it’ or ‘don’t be slow about it’ they are usually angry or not happy with the person they are speaking to.

Be quick about it/don’t be slow about it’ is used to tell the listener to do the action now and not to wait.
Native speakers use this construction when they are frustrated or annoyed with the person they are speaking too.
DO NOT USE THIS CONSTRUTION WHEN YOU ARE HAPPY WITH THE ACTIONS OF THE LISTNER.




When I asked my student, she told me that she had learnt the phrase “be quick about it” from an English teacher, who told her that is was safe to use in all contexts.
My student also told me that the English teacher who made this mistake was a non-native.
I suppose this is where the error occurred. It is not a question of construction or grammar but of context.
Remember it is always best to learn your English from native speaking English teachers who have been trained to teach English as a foreign language.

About quick review.

About, as a conjunction is used to explain a statement or phrase.
About, as a preposition.
About to’ is used to express when an imminent planned future action is prevented from happening by an unforeseen present action.
On its own ‘about it’ is used to ask for instructions or information.
Be quick about it/don’t be slow about it’ is used to tell the listener to do the action now and not to wait.
Native speakers use this construction when they are frustrated or annoyed with the person they are speaking too.
DO NOTE USE THIS CONSTRUTION WHEN YOU ARE HAPPY WITH THE ACTIONS OF THE LISTNER.

¿Está cometiendo este error cuando usa la palabra acerca de

About - Is it rude?

Take this fun free quiz to test what you know about, about!

What are Do-English online English lessons?

Online English lessons from Do-English are English lessons that take place in virtual classrooms with a native English tutor and between 3 and 10 students.
Just like real language school classrooms, Do-English virtual classrooms have video & audio, whiteboard, learning library, and many more functions.

Are Do-English online English lessons structured?

Yes, they are.
At Do-English our tutors are all trained TEFL tutors.
We use internationally proven course books, from the famous Headyway to Market Leader and many more in-between.
We also know that continuity in learning is very important.
That is why our clients always have the same tutor, and classmates at the same time each week.
Don’t be fooled by online schools offering unlimited lessons, such lessons could be in large chat rooms, with multiply users all trying to get the attention of just one teacher.

Why Should I choose Do-English for my English lessons?

There are many reasons to choose Do-English, and here is a list of a few:

  • Our tutors are native English tutors who live in English speaking countries.
  • Our administration team is in Spain and speak Spanish.
  • Our virtual classrooms are proper classrooms, not just Skype or WOW.
  • Our lessons are value for money
  • You can learn from anywhere there is an internet connection.

We want you to try before you buy.

Text: Feargal Coffey – feargal@do-english.es
Meme: Feargal Coffey – feargal@do-english.es
Translation: Juan Luis Ramon Cervera – juan@do-english.es
Photos: Pixabay
(c) 2017 Do-English

#About #English #Grammar #Online #Free #Lesson




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